Tasneem Asultan, la photographe qui lève le voile des clichés

 

Le mariage est un moment où se mêlent histoire, famille et tradition. Une photographe américano-saoudienne montre – notamment via Instagram – un autre visage du Golfe. Un visage assez inédit dans les médias généralistes.

Le mariage reste un moment important pour un certain nombre de familles du Golfe et du Proche-Orient. Derrière l’image d’oppression de la femme, de burqa et de soumission, la photographe américano-saoudienne Tasneem Asultan publie régulièrement ses œuvres sur le réseau social favori des afficionados d’images : Instagram.

De l’insolite au positif … Vive le mariage !

L’occasion de découvrir les dessous de différentes confessions et cultures. Tasneem Asultan n’hésite pas à expliquer ce que révèle chaque image, que ce soit une tradition, comment les mariés se sont rencontrés ou une anecdote insolite. Bref, un bon combo de couleurs, d’amour et de rires…

Tous les ingrédients sont là pour voyager un peu et découvrir l’évolution des sociétés, notamment à travers cette institution qu’est encore le mariage pour beaucoup. La jeune femme ne se limite pas au Moyen-Orient puisqu’elle nous fait découvrir aussi les traditions du Maroc ou encore du Rajasthan.

Un vrai travail de terrain

Enfin, derrière ces belles images, Tasneem Asultan cherche à documenter une vraie étude sociologique sur le long terme. D’ailleurs, elle travaille encore sur l’un de ses projets Saudi Tales of Love, que l’on peut traduire par « Contes d’amour saoudiens ». Son but : mettre en lumière la complexité du mariage et ses conséquences, à travers les témoignages de femmes saoudiennes.

Razan, the bride, and her friends sing: "We like big butts and we can not lie" instead of the usual traditional Arab henna songs, as they enter the party. . Before white bridal dresses were introduced to weddings in the Arab gulf countries (Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, Oman and the UAE), Arab brides would wear one or more colorful hand woven silk and gold colored threaded dresses accompanied by gold and pearl jewelry decorating their hair and hands. Elderly women would surround the bride singing folklore songs while she sat with her palms and feet being decorated with henna. Her friends, singing and dancing, would replace the decorative fabric over her head after every song. The groom would only enter in the late hours of the evening to walk his bride out as their guests threw money and candy at them both for good luck. Nowadays, a few brides celebrate the traditional Khaleeji henna night called Jelwa/Jalawat or Ghomra. This happens, most often, a day or two before the wedding. #everydayeverywhere #everydaymiddleeast #abudhabi #uae #khaleeji #gcc #henna #jelwa

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He Says: "How can I forget the day that changed my life? I had been going to the gym for the past four years, but that day was like no other? Come to think of it, that whole month was like no other. I had been noticing her—a burst of energy, a smile to die for, and a simplicity that spoke volumes. Respectful to people around her, kind to all, humble, and always giving. I wondered if she would notice me, cause I wasn’t the only one who was noticing her. One morning as I was biking next to her, I saw her expression change from a smile to a frown. She stared at her IPod, with the battery sign staring back at her. I offered her mine. Music brought us together, and we became good friends. For all those who know Tania, she can be an earful, but even the silent moments we shared didn’t seem awkward. As I got to know her more, I realized she made my life beautiful. I was a confident young man, yet I felt scared for the first time at the thought of losing her. How would I lose her if I didn’t even ask her out? 2am, Aug 13, 2011 after contemplating for what seemed like eternity, I sent her a text message, she understood, and we’ve never had to look back. I feel like the luckiest guy to have her as my partner." My first wedding in India was of Tania and Robyn. It was because of their serene personalities, in the midst of such eventful and beautifully chaotic four day wedding, that I fell in love with India and it's romantic people.

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Alym met Payal in Bahrain. In a gym. She didn't give him any attention as she saw the other girls all comment on how cute he was. It was only after a few months of him insisting she go out with him, and her noticing how humble and sweet he was that she finally gave him a chance. Whilst Payal has a reputation for throwing amazingly infamous parties wherever she is, due to her infectious vibrant laughter and good story telling; Alym is known for being ultra calm. His quietness makes you think twice before you comment. A marriage that enforces the idea, opposites attract. The Hindu bride weds the Muslim groom in a 3 day wedding celebration in Bahrain. This was day 1, with the theme Arabian nights. #Bahrain #wedding

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Thank you @worldphotoorg & @Sony for an eventful week! ・・・ Tasneem Alsultan has won 1st place in @Sony @WorldPhotoOrg Professional division's Contemporary Issues category with her project "Saudi Tales of Love" An exhibition in London of all the winning and shortlisted work from the 2017 @Sony World Photography Awards, along with rarely seen images by British photographer @martinparrstudio , will run at @SomersetHouseLondon, from 21 April – 7 May. #SWPA The project questions the necessity of marriage in relation to personal significance and love, and Tasneem has used the project to follow, document, and explore the stories of Saudi women from a variety of backgrounds and experiences. #sauditalesoflove #saudi #tasneemalsultan

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"Our story crossed 2 continents and 4 countries. I met Sagar in the south of France, whilst visiting my brother who was also working there in 2011. I knew Sagar was the one the moment I met him and told him we were meant to be. . One year and too many failed attempts later, I got a job offer in Chile and told Sagar I’d move if he swore he really didn’t feel the same. He said no, so I packed my bags and left Portugal. Of course the moment I landed, Sagar called me to say he made a mistake. . He flew to Chile to try and bring me back twice, but I said no. He decided to wait for as long as it took and finally convinced me to move back after two years. He proposed 6 months later at the London Bridge where we last saw each other in Europe. I said 'Yes, of course. We were finally in the same time zone'"@senoritakanji & @gulabanis celebrated their wedding in both Portugal, then in India. I had the pleasure to photograph both, and listen to the longer version that should be made into a movie. #wedding

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Before white bridal dresses were introduced to weddings in the Arab gulf countries (Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, Oman and the UAE), Arab brides would wear one or more colorful hand woven silk and gold colored threaded dresses accompanied by gold and pearl jewelry decorating their hair and hands. Elderly women would surround the bride singing folklore songs while she sat with her palms and feet being decorated with henna. Her friends, singing and dancing, would replace the decorative fabric over her head after every song. The groom would only enter in the late hours of the evening to walk his bride out as their guests threw money and candy at them both for good luck. Nowadays, a few brides celebrate the traditional Khaleeji henna night called Jelwa/Jalawat or Ghomra. This happens, most often, a day or two before the wedding. #everydayeverywhere #everydaymiddleeast #abudhabi #uae #khaleeji #gcc #henna #jelwa #weddingphotography #weddingphotography

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Pourquoi se marie-t-on ? La sociologie répond

Sommaire

Dans la culture, vive les mariés… ou pas !